Here is another chapter in our primer for those Hoosiers who have been transplanted here from another state. It is well to understand that you now are living in Indiana. For example:

• You know several people who have hit a deer.

• Your school classes were canceled because of cold.

• Your school classes were canceled because of heat.

• You've heard of Euchre, you know how to play Euchre, and you are a master of Euchre.

• You've seen a running car, with nobody in it, in the parking lot of the grocery store, no matter what time of year it is.

• Detasseling was your first job. Baling hay, your second. Or you could stack hay, swim in the pond to clean off and then have the strength to play a couple of games of hoops, all in the same barn lot on the same day.

• You say things like catty-wampus and kitty corner and know what they mean.

• You install security lights on your house and garage, then leave them both unlocked.

• You carry jumper cables in your car regularly.

• You drink pop.

• You catch frogs at the crick.

• If you want someone to hear you, you holler at 'em.

• You know that baling wire was the predecessor to duct tape.

• You know that strangers are the only ones who come to your front door.

• Kids and dogs ride in the passenger seats of cars and the backs of pickups.

• You think nothing of driving on the roads and being stuck behind a farm implement in spring and fall. You just hope it's not a hog truck or a manure spreader.

• High school basketball games draw bigger crowds on the weekend than a movie theater.

• Driving is better in the winter because the potholes are filled with snow.

• You can repeat the winners of the last eight NBA games, but unless the MVP is a Hoosier, you are not sure who he is.

• You can see at least two basketball hoops from your yard.

• The biggest question of your youth was I.U. or Purdue.

• Indianapolis is the big city.

• Getting stuck by a train is a legitimate excuse for being late to school or work.

• You've been to the Covered Bridge Festival. And you took back roads to get there. Why sit in traffic?

• To you, tenderloin is not an expensive cut of beef, but a big, salty, breaded and fried piece of pork served on a bun with pickle and onion.

• You end your sentences with prepositions, as in "Where's it at?" or "Where's he going to?"